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Boston researchers say Stabler had the brain disease CTE. Boston University confirmed the diagnosis Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2016. Stabler, who died of colon cancer at 69 in July 2015, had Stage 3 chronic traumatic encephalopathy, Dr. Ann McKee told The …

Oakland Raiders quarterback Ken Stabler stands on the sidelines during the second half of AFC championship game against the Pittsburgh Steelers in Oakland, Calif. Boston researchers say Stabler had the brain disease CTE. Boston University confirmed the diagnosis Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2016. Stabler, who died of colon cancer at 69 in July 2015, had Stage 3 chronic traumatic encephalopathy, Dr. Ann McKee told The Associated Press. McKee said the disease was widespread throughout his brain, with “severe” damage to the regions involving learning, memory and regulation of emotion.

In this Dec. 27, 1976, file photo, Oakland Raiders quarterback Ken Stabler stands on the sidelines during the second half of AFC championship game against the Pittsburgh Steelers in Oakland, Calif. Boston researchers say Stabler had the brain disease CTE. Boston University confirmed the diagnosis Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2016. Stabler, who died of colon cancer at 69 in July 2015, had Stage 3 chronic traumatic encephalopathy, Dr. Ann McKee told The Associated Press. McKee said the disease was widespread throughout his brain, with “severe” damage to the regions involving learning, memory and regulation of emotion. 

Has the latest information about head injuries and brain damage in football changed your viewing or fantasy league habits? Are you thinking twice about sending your kids to the gridiron?

ESPN college football analyst and former NFL center Ed Cunningham announced Wednesday that he resigned from the network because of his concerns over head injuries. Cunningham told the New York Times, “I take full ownership of my alignment with the sport. I can just no longer be in that cheerleader’s spot … But the real crux of this is that I just don’t think the game is safe for the brain. To me, it’s unacceptable.”

Over the summer, a study of former NFL players’ autopsies found 110 of 111 brains were positive for the degenerative brain disease chronic traumatic encephalopathy or CTE.

 

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